千与千寻英文影评简短

千与千寻 英语简介

Chihiro,

a

10-year-old

girl,

moved

from

the

city

to

the

countryside

with

her

parents.

10岁的少女千寻与父母一起从都市搬家到了乡下。

Unexpectedly,

on

the

way

to

move,

the

family

had

an

accident.

没想到在搬家的途中,一家人发生了意外。

They

entered

the

strange

world

controlled

by

the

soup

house

owner,

the

devil

girl,

where

the

people

who

did

not

work

would

be

turned

into

animals.

他们进入了汤屋老板魔女控制的奇特世界——在那里不劳动的人将会被变成动物。

Chihiro's

father

and

mother

turned

into

a

pig

because

of

greedy

food.

In

order

to

save

his

father

and

mother,

thousand

search

had

gone

through

many

hardships.

千寻的爸爸妈妈因贪吃变成了猪,千寻为了救爸爸妈妈经历了很多磨难。

During

that

time,

she

met

White

Dragon,

a

clever

and

ruthless

teenager.

After

experiencing

many

things,

Chihiro

finally

rescued

his

father

and

mother

and

rescued

White

Dragon.

在期间她遇见了白龙,一个既聪明又冷酷的少年,在经历了很多事情之后,千寻最后救出了爸爸妈妈,拯救了白龙。

扩展资料

角色介绍

1、荻野千寻

配音:柊瑠美

简介:千寻是一个瘦小的十岁小女孩。在搬迁的路上,误入鬼怪神灵休息的世界,他在好心人的指点下在汤婆婆那里工作,最后帮助白龙想起了自己的名字,解除扒悄身上的咒语。

2、赈早见琥珀主

配音:入野自由

简介:人类世界的琥珀川河神,真身是白龙。因为琥珀川河流被掩埋而无家可归,来到汤屋在汤婆婆门下学魔法,成为汤婆婆的弟子,并忘记自己的名字,被称为“小白”。

3、汤婆婆

配音:夏木真理

简介:澡堂“汤屋”的主管,同时也是镇上的管理人。她还经常会化身为黑翅膀的大鸟出门巡视,命令凡是不工作的人都要变成猪被吃掉,而为她工作的人都会被拿掉名字,一旦记不起来,就永远都离开不了她的春槐渣澡堂了,然而,她对澡堂的客明帆人却是百依百顺,笑脸相迎,每天都在房间里数钱记账。

4、钱婆婆

配音:夏木真理

简介:汤婆婆的双胞胎姐姐,她们都长得一样,连手上带的戒指都是一样的。钱婆婆要千寻交出白龙,千寻把印章交还给她,并且代替白龙向钱婆婆道歉,之后钱婆婆原谅了白龙的所作所为,还送了千寻一个头绳护身符。

参考资料来源:百度百科-千与千寻

名著读后感,或英语电影影评,1000字以上,要英文的,三篇……

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英文影评:千与千寻(Spirited

Away)

Animated

feature

from

Japanese

master

Hayao

Miyazaki.

A

young

girl

finds

herself

trapped

in

a

mystical

realm,

where

she

must

find

a

way

to

save

her

parents

-

who

have

been

turned

into

pigs

There's

something

almost

criminal

about

the

way

Spirited

Away

took

over

two

years

to

reach

Britain

after

its

original

Japanese

release.

In

Japan,

Hayao

Miyazaki

is

both

commercially

successful

(his

films

regularly

beat

box

office

records)

and

highly

respected

(Akira

Kurosawa

said:

"I

am

somewhat

disturbed

when

critics

lump

our

works

together.

One

cannot

mimimise

the

importance

of

Miyazaki's

work

by

comparing

it

to

mine.").

In

Britain,

however,

his

work

has

barely

got

more

than

a

few

cursory

arts

venue

screenings.

At

least

Spirited

Away

-

which

took

the

Berlin

Golden

Bear

in

2002

and

the

Best

Animated

Film

Oscar

in

2003

-

made

it.

Better

late

than

never.

After

the

stress

of

making

his

last

film,

1997's

Princess

Mononoke,

Miyazaki

had

a

breakdown

and

retired.

But

he

came

out

of

retirement

when

an

idea

to

create

another,

lighter

film

began

to

take

shape.

Princess

Mononoke

was

an

action-packed

epic

that

ranged

across

15th

century

Japan.

For

Spirited

Away

he

returned

to

the

quieter

-

but

no

less

serious

-

themes

that

he

addressed

to

a

degree

in

1988's

My

Neighbor

Tortoro.

Both

films

feature

a

family

moving

house,

girls

getting

used

to

upheaval,

and

elements

of

'Alice

In

Wonderland'.

But

where

the

1988

film

used

a

few

specific

motifs

from

Carroll's

book

(a

plunge

into

a

'rabbit

hole',

a

version

of

the

Cheshire

cat),

Spirited

Away

casts

its

10-year-old

protagonist,

Chihiro

(Hîragi;

or

Chase

in

the

US

dub),

fully

into

a

Wonderland,

a

mystical

otherworld

populated

by

animal

spirits

and

gods.

Chihiro

arrives

in

this

realm

by

accident.

Her

parents,

heading

for

their

new

home,

take

a

road

that

leads

into

the

woods.

Arriving

at

a

dead

end,

they

walk

down

a

corridor

through

a

building

and

emerge

in

what

dad

takes

to

be

"an

abandoned

theme

park".

It's

something

like

a

Japanese

Portmeirion,

but

eerily

deserted.

While

her

parents

greedily

help

themselves

to

food,

Chihiro

wanders

off

and

meets

Haku

(Irino;

or

Marsden),

a

boy

who

warns

her

to

leave

before

dark.

She's

too

late

though

-

a

lake

has

appeared,

blocking

her

route,

ghostly

forms

have

populated

the

town

and

her

parents

have

turned

into

pigs.

She's

trapped.

The

only

way

to

survive,

Haku

tells

her,

is

to

get

work

in

the

bath

house

that

dominates

the

town.

Here

"eight

million

gods

rest

their

weary

bones",

according

to

Yubaba

(Natsuki;

or

Pleshette),

the

witch

who

runs

the

establishment.

Chihiro

makes

her

way

to

meet

Yubaba

with

the

help

of

Kamajii

(Sugawara;

Ogden

Stiers),

a

multi-limbed

codger

who

runs

the

boiler

house,

Lin

(Tamai;

Egan),

a

serving

woman

with

a

taste

for

"roasted

newt",

and

even

a

'Radish

God',

a

giant

sumo

of

a

chap

with

tuber-like

appendages.

Yubaba

is

hardly

forthcoming

-

her

realm

is

"no

place

for

humans"

-

but

she's

forced

to

give

Chihiro

work,

thanks

to

an

oath

she

swore.

Chihiro

gets

work

helping

Lin.

But

the

management

give

them

the

worst

jobs

-

such

as

assisting

a

hideous

oozing

creature

they

take

to

be

a

"Stink

God;

an

extra

large

stinker

at

that".

It's

an

entity

so

foul

its

smell

makes

food

rot

instantaneously,

while

its

suppurations

fill

the

room

with

a

noxious

gloop.

Chihiro

-

or

Sen

as

she

becomes

when

Yubaba

takes

her

name

as

part

of

her

contract

-

does

get

by

in

the

bath

house,

but

it's

not

without

further

incident.

She

may

lose

her

identity,

but

she

retains

her

decency.

One

act

of

kindness

results

in

a

dangerous

spirit,

No

Face,

getting

into

the

bath

house

and

wreaking

havoc

by

playing

on

the

greed

of

the

other

employees

("Gold

springs

from

his

palms!").

She

even

gets

involved

in

an

adventure

that

reveals

her

mysterious

bond

with

Haku.

But

can

she

save

her

parents?

It's

often

said

that

Katsuhiro

Otomo's

Akira

(1988)

is

the

greatest

anime

ever.

That's

as

maybe,

but

every

one

of

Miyazaki's

films

is

a

masterpiece,

so

it's

hard

to

pick

just

one

that

stands

out.

It's

also

tricky

to

compare

his

works

with

the

more

traditionally

received

notion

of

anime

(giant

robots,

demons

with

phallic

tentacles,

telekinetic

fighting,

atom

bomb-style

explosions

etc).

Although

Miyazaki

insists

it's

not

his

role

to

be

didactic,

all

of

his

work

(notably

his

second

feature

Nausicaa

Of

The

Valley

Of

The

Wind

and

Princess

Mononoke)

has

strong

messages

about

ecology

and

the

human

relationship

with

the

natural

world.

But

he's

also

fascinated

with

coming-of-age

stories,

notably

about

how

girls

(many

of

his

protagonists

are

young

females)

can

not

only

face

up

to

adult

responsibility,

but

also

how

they

can

become

strong,

principled

members

of

society.

Here

Chihiro

is

forced

to

grow

up

fast,

but

the

process,

while

gruelling,

is

not

without

real

benefits,

as

her

understanding

of

the

way

society

functions

and

experience

of

adult

emotions

develops

exponentially.

Some

aspects

of

the

film

are

likely

to

be

too

foreign

for

Westerners

-

we're

ignorant

of

Japanese

belief

systems,

with

their

hierarchies

of

entities

-

but

Miyazaki's

work

has

the

power

to

transcend

such

culturally

specific

elements.

While

many

of

his

earlier

films

drew

on

European

stories

(such

as

1986's

Castle

In

The

Sky,

from

Swift),

the

folkloric

features

he

reworks

are

often

universal.

But

most

of

all,

his

team's

animation

-

here

utilising

more

digital

techniques,

while

still

being

grounded

in

2D

traditions

-

is

always

beautiful

and,

in

places,

breathtaking.

Locations

are

atmospheric,

details

are

immaculate

(you

can

identify

the

flower

species

in

the

gardens)

and

characters

are

diverse.

Yubaba,

for

example,

is

a

bizarre

creation,

a

stocky

woman

with

a

huge

head

and

even

bigger

hairdo;

the

bath

house

itself

is

stocked

with

all

sorts

of

weird

and

wonderful

creatures,

from

a

Kermit-like

assistant,

to

creatures

reminiscent

of

his

cuddly

woodland

deity

from

My

Neighbor

Tortoro,

to

troll-like

beasts

that

look

related

to

Maurice

Sendak's

'Wild

Things').

The

only

factor

that

could

be

seen

as

mildly

misjudged

is

Hisaishi's

score,

which

is

overbearing

in

places.

It's

no

wonder

the

likes

of

Pixar's

John

Lasseter

(who

executive

produced

the

US

dub)

are

so

full

of

praise

for

Miyazaki.

He's

a

true

genius,

an

artist

and

great

filmmaker

who

happens

to

work

in

animation

-

a

medium

often

belittled

as

childish

in

the

West.

Spirited

Away

is

wonderful.

蜜蜂总动员

Bee

Movie

review

by

Roger

Ebert

From

each

according

to

his

ability,

to

each

according

to

his

need.

--

Karl

Marx

Applied

with

strict

rigor,

that's

how

bee

society

works

in

Jerry

Seinfeld's

"Bee

Movie"

and

apparently

in

real

life.

Doesn't

seem

like

much

fun.

You

are

born,

grow

a

little,

attend

school

for

three

days,

and

then

go

to

work

for

the

rest

of

your

life.

"Are

you

going

to

work

us

to

death?"

a

young

bee

asks

during

a

briefing.

"We

certainly

hope

so!"

says

the

smiling

lecturer,

to

appreciative

chuckles

all

around.

One

bee,

however,

is

not

so

thrilled

with

the

system.

His

name

is

Barry

B.

Benson,

and

he

is

voiced

by

Seinfeld

as

a

rebel

who

wants

to

experience

the

world

before

settling

down

to

a

lifetime

job

as,

for

example,

a

Crud

Remover.

He

sneaks

into

a

formation

of

ace

pollinators,

flies

out

of

the

hive,

has

a

dizzying

flight

through

Central

Park,

and

ends

up

(never

mind

how)

making

a

friend

of

a

human

named

Vanessa

(voice

of

Renee

Zellweger).

Then

their

relationship

blossoms

into

something

more,

although

not

very

much

more,

given

the

physical

differences.

Compared

to

them,

a

Chihuahua

and

a

Great

Dane

would

have

it

easy.

This

friendship

is

against

all

the

rules.

Bees

are

forbidden

to

speak

to

humans.

And

humans

tend

to

swat

bees

(there's

a

good

laugh

when

Barry

explains

how

a

friend

was

offed

by

a

rolled-up

copy

of

French

Vogue).

What

Barry

mostly

discovers

from

human

society

is,

gasp!,

that

humans

rob

the

bees

of

all

their

honey

and

eat

it.

He

and

Adam,

his

best

pal

(Matthew

Broderick),

even

visit

a

bee

farm,

which

looks

like

forced

labor

of

the

worst

sort.

Their

instant

analysis

of

the

human-bee

economic

relationship

is

pure

Marxism,

if

only

they

knew

it.

Barry

and

Adam

end

up

bringing

a

lawsuit

against

the

human

race

for

its

exploitation

of

all

bees

everywhere,

and

this

court

case

(with

a

judge

voiced

by

Oprah

Winfrey)

is

enlivened

by

the

rotund,

syrupy

voiced

Layton

T.

Montgomery

(John

Goodman),

attorney

for

the

human

race,

who

talks

like

a

cross

between

Fred

Thompson

and

Foghorn

Leghorn.

If

the

bees

win

their

case,

Montgomery

jokes,

he'd

have

to

negotiate

with

silkworms

for

the

stuff

that

holds

up

his

britches.

All

of

this

material,

written

by

Seinfeld

and

writers

associated

with

his

television

series,

tries

hard,

but

never

really

takes

off.

We

learn

at

the

outset

of

the

movie

that

bees

theoretically

cannot

fly.

Unfortunately,

in

the

movie,

that

applies

only

to

the

screenplay.

It

is

really,

really,

really

hard

to

care

much

about

a

platonic

romantic

relationship

between

Renee

Zellweger

and

a

bee,

although

if

anyone

could

pull

if

off,

she

could.

Barry

and

Adam

come

across

as

earnest,

articulate

young

bees

who

pursue

logic

into

the

realm

of

the

bizarre,

as

sometimes

happened

on

the

"Seinfeld"

show.

Most

of

the

humor

is

verbal,

and

tends

toward

the

gently

ironic

rather

than

the

hilarious.

Chris

Rock

scores

best,

as

a

mosquito

named

Mooseblood,

but

his

biggest

laugh

comes

from

a

recycled

lawyer

joke.

In

the

tradition

of

many

recent

animated

films,

several

famous

people

turn

up

playing

themselves,

including

Sting

(how

did

he

earn

that

name?)

and

Ray

Liotta,

who

is

called

as

a

witness

because

his

brand

of

Ray

Liotta

Honey

profiteers

from

the

labors

of

bees.

Liotta's

character

and

voice

work

are

actually

kind

of

inspired,

leaving

me

to

regret

the

absence

of

B.B.

King,

Burt's

Bees,

Johnny

B.

Goode,

and

the

evil

Canadian

bee

slavemaster

Norman

Jewison,

who

--

oh,

I

forgot,

he

exploits

maple

trees.

贫民富翁(Slumdog

Millionaire)

An

orphaned

Mumbai

slum

kid

tries

to

change

his

life

by

winning

TV's

'Who

Wants

To

Be

A

Millionaire?'

in

a

feelgood

fable

from

director

Danny

Boyle

and

the

writer

of

The

Full

Monty,

Simon

Beaufoy

Jamal

Malik

('Skins'

star

Dev

Patel)

is

being

beaten

by

Mumbai

police

for

allegedly

cheating

on

hit

TV

show

'Who

Wants

To

Be

A

Millionaire?'

One

question

away

from

the

ultimate

20

million

rupee

prize,

no

one,

including

slick

show

host

Prem

(Anil

Kapoor),

believes

a

chai

wallah

(teaboy)

like

Jamal

could

know

all

the

answers.

As

the

tough

inspector

(Irfan

Khan)

replays

Jamal's

appearance

on

the

show,

it's

revealed

that

each

question

corresponds

to

a

specific

life

lesson

from

Jamal's

tragic

past.

Raised

in

abject

poverty

in

Mumbai's

grimmest

slum

along

with

older

brother

Salim,

then

orphaned

by

a

Hindu

mob

attack,

Jamal

and

Salim

are

forced

to

fend

for

themselves

on

the

streets

through

opportunistic

petty

crime.

They

pick

up

a

young

girl,

fellow

orphan

Latika

(Freida

Pinto),

escape

the

clutches

of

a

vicious

Fagin-like

crime

boss,

lose

Latika,

and

continue

their

picaresque

adventures,

one

step

ahead

of

the

law.

As

adolescents,

however,

Salim

becomes

entranced

by

a

life

of

crime

and

Latika's

unexpected

return

sets

brother

against

brother.

Will

Jamal

salvage

his

girl,

his

fortune

and

his

life

on

'Millionaire'?

Adapted

by

Full

Monty

writer

Simon

Beaufoy

from

Vikas

Swarup's

hit

novel

'Q&A',

Slumdog

is

an

underdog

tale.

Beaufoy's

lively

screenplay

scampers

after

Swarup's

self-consciously

Dickensian

storytelling

tradition,

and

is

even

built

around

the

'Millionaire'

show,

as

iconic

a

symbol

of

Western

capitalist

entertainment

as

exists.

Director

Danny

Boyle

and

cinematographer

Anthony

Dod

Mantle

have

evidently

immersed

themselves

in

India's

sensory

overload.

The

film

revels

in

the

sub-continent's

chaotic

beauty

and

raging

colours,

from

Mumbai

shantytowns

to

Agra's

regal

Taj

Mahal.

The

thrillingly

off-the-cuff

digital

imagery

reflects

a

nation

in

a

state

of

explosive

flux,

looming

skyscrapers

erupting

from

wasteland,

slum

kids

turning

into

overnight

millionaires

through

the

kiss

of

television.

The

film's

uniquely

vibrant,

headlong

21st

century

rush

is

that

of

the

infinite

possibilities

of

modern

India

itself.

Slumdog's

such

a

crowd-pleaser

that

some

critics

might

brand

it

Boyle's

best

since

Trainspotting

.

It

even

echoes

a

couple

of

that

film's

classic

set

pieces,

notably

a

slum

chase

reminiscent

of

Renton

and

Co's

opening

Edinburgh

dash

and

a

lavatorial

incident

so

stomach-churning

(yet

hilarious),

it

makes

Trainspotting's

infamous

toilet

scene

seem

like

Ewan

McGregor

took

an

Evian

bath.

In

fact,

the

likable

Boyle

has

been

on

great

form

for

some

time

-

28

Days

Later

revamped

the

zombie

movie,

Millions

is

perhaps

the

best

kids

film

of

recent

years.

No

other

current

British

director

makes

such

thrillingly

current

(all

his

films

are

set

in

either

the

present

or

future),

kinetic,

inherently

visual

films

and

proper

recognition

is

long

overdue

-

though,

true

to

form,

he's

insistent

here

on

crediting

co-director

Loveleen

Tandan,

whose

major

contribution

seems

to

have

been

unearthing

the

wonderfully

naturalistic

kids

to

play

Jamal,

Salim

and

Latika.

Verdict

A

spirited

underdog

fable

marinated

in

modern

India's

melting

pot.

Danny

Boyle's

still

the

master

of

spices.

spirited away,千与千寻英语观后感700字

This

was

a

film

"spirited

away".

Because

I'm

not

Hayao

Miyazaki,

I

don't

understand

what

Hayao

Miyazaki

was

thinking

about

when

he

was

writing

the

film

and

what

he

was

going

to

bring

to

us.

If

it

is

the

theme

of

growth,

the

film

is

like

a

miniature

of

the

child's

world,

and

the

millennium

is

the

child's

representative.

It

includes

o

worlds:

the

real

world

and

the

spiritual

world.

That

is,

it

allows

us

to

see

that

there

are

many

bad

things

in

the

real

world:

human

greed,

cold,

numbness

and

so

on,

and

Chihiro

is

a

negative

example

of

these

phenomena,

she

always

remind

of

something

humans

are

disappearing:

innocence,

kindness,

courage,

harmony,

etc.When

Qian

Qian

and

her

parents

entered

another

world

which

is

not

a

reality,

a

human

being

was

unwele

there,

and

the

gods

felt

that

the

world

was

bad.

The

journey

of

growth

began.

From

a

long

time

ago,

it

was

known

that

there

was

a

cartoon

like

this,

but

it

was

the

first

time

to

watch

the

summer

vacation.

The

story

is

very

dramatic

and

fairy

tale.

From

the

long

old

tunnel,

the

strange

stone

carving

to

the

"talking

house",

the

beginning

of

the

movie

gives

people

a

horrible

feeling.

They

came

to

a

strange

town.

There

was

no

one

in

the

town,

but

there

was

a

delicious

food.

The

thousand

homing

father

and

mother

did

not

take

care

of

the

thousand

homing

and

eat

unattended

food

without

permission.

Thousands

of

helplessness

had

to

walk

around

the

town,

hoping

to

find

something.

As

it

was

getting

dark,

Chihiro

accidentally

saw

the

tram,

the

excitement

was

called

a

white

boy

shouted

back.

In

the

film,

the

race

of

the

thousand

search

and

the

lamp

is

worth

the

aftertaste,

and

the

helpless

cry

from

the

side

reflects

the

weakness

of

the

human

being.

Not

their

own

things

can

not

be,

only

the

things

that

you

have

to

work

hard

to

use

in

mind.

When

the

man

without

face

to

Chihiro

gold,

Chihiro

no,

because

she

doesn't

need,

not

greedy,

that

does

not

belong

to

her

things,

and

that

is

because

of

the

love

of

money

is

the

frog

man

without

face

to

swallow.

Man

without

face,

he

is

lost

in

the

capital

of

desire

and

can

not

find

himself.

He

changed

gold,

because

people

like

gold.

In

reality,

too

many

people

in

authority,

hedoni

***

,

money

worship.

In

the

course

of

the

growth

of

children,

we

have

taught

them

not

to

learn

to

worship

money

and

to

find

their

true

value.

No

fancy

animation,

no

plex

characters,

it

tells

the

story

of

a

similar

to

Western

fairy

tales

in

"the

wizard

of

Oz"

story:

Chihiro

and

parents

into

a

very

strange

town,

parents

variation

for

the

pig,

in

danger

of

being

slaughtered,

yubaba's

apprentice

in

white,

under

the

boiler

grandpa

Linda

and

sister

help

and

their

own

unremitting

efforts,

finally

one

family

reunion.

Even

so,

but

the

author's

feelings

very

delicate,

so

very

touching,

even

in

the

eighty

thousand

immortals

and

ghosts

debut

of

the

her

world,

often

also

can

feel

the

beauty

of

Japanese

folk

in

the

ways

of

the

world.

This

is

one

of

the

attractions

of

the

film.

Chihiro

world

is

so

beautiful

and

tranquil,

like

flowers

in

full

bloom

in

the

summer

with

the

same

nature.

When

the

young

white

dragon

fly,

gentle

wind

blowing

over

the

ears;

when

the

Tsing

Yi

girl

lapras

vacated,

hair

flying;

the

moment

we

had

so

firmly

believe

that.

However,

the

world

is

so

impermanent.

As

if

the

wind

and

cloud

suddenly

changed

direction,

we

looked

forward

to

waiting

for

the

picture

to

slide

silently

like

a

trolley

and

disappear

in

the

distance.

Only

hear

white

dragon

gently

shaking

his

head

and

say,

"little

thousand,

you

must

remember,

never

turn

back,

you

must

always

go

forward..."

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